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Team WallWalkers go where others won’t, with minimal fuss and without the need for expensive scaffolding. Ever since that playful remark from an architect client who asked if we could access the top of a steeple to look at the condition of a weathervane, we have evolved it into a unique and specialist skill. Now we frequently find ourselves high atop churches, keeping them looking their very best!

The Job:

We were recently called upon to restore a flagpole on top of a church tower in London and, while we were up there, grease the weathervanes on each of the four pinnacles so the wind could move them more easily.

The Method:

Day one saw us ascending the flagpole and utilising our tried and tested prusik system; a friction hitch created by putting a loop of rope or chord around an area which, when force is applied, tightens around the surface area and ‘bites’ in to place. We then rigged ropes at the top, which allowed for easier positioning and a safe anchor to work from. After that it was time to turn our attention to preparing the flagpole itself, which we sanded, wire brushed and wiped clear of all loose and flaking debris.

When the flagpole was even, we could began the process of applying a base coat of smooth, pure white Hammerite paint. This is a durable, corrosion resistant paint that can be applied directly to mental and actively eats away at rust. The next day we applied an additional coat of Hammerite, thereby creating a thick and glossy layer to protect the metal from rust and provide consistent coverage across the flagpole’s surface.

On the final day we fitted a new Halyard system so the flag could be raised and lowered smoothly and easily, after which we greased the four weathervanes, making sure to take photos of the serious degradation which will need to be looked at in the near future.

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